The Secret to A Happy Marriage

I don’t claim to be a marriage expert by any means. I think my husband would agree, that I can be less then the perfect wife; just as he can be far from the perfect husband. That being said, when I think I am being tough to live with, I make the effort to communicate this and apologize; and THAT I think is the key to a happy marriage. Admitting imperfection, acceptance of each other and COMMUNICATION.

Anyhow I came across this article today via Parent Hacks and it inspired this post. I fully agree with the authors wisdom here. This Friday we have 5 years of happy marriage, and I look forward to endless more. I especially like the bit about little eyes are watching.

1. A strong marriage is built of tiny actions.

“It’s the little things.” Such a cliche! Such bad sentence construction! And such truth.

Each time you discuss instead of demand, you strengthen your marriage. Same goes for speaking with respect instead of sarcasm, and listening instead of dismissing, and engaging instead of eye-rolling.

Each action is like a brick. You choose whether to use it to build a foundation or a wall.

2. But don’t forget the grand gesture.

Buying flowers or surprising your spouse with a vacation, an iPad, or a day off from dishwashing won’t make your marriage. But it will cause your partner to snap out of the day-to-day routine and take notice. Sometimes that’s all it takes to get the ball rolling in a very pleasant direction.

3. Never underestimate the importance of a good laugh.

Sometimes life as a grownup can be hard, boring, and downright drudgery. Another cliche fits here: “If I didn’t laugh, I’d probably cry.” So laugh. A lot.

What do you both find funny? Comedies? Jon Stewart? Silly t-shirts? Private jokes? Sneezing pandas? Write a “funny” list, then commit yourself to experiencing at least one of these things together every day. You’ll thank me.

4. All good marriages have a supporting cast.

There’s an odd fallacy about marriage (middle-class, American marriage, perhaps) that it should somehow stand on its own. If two people love each other, have shared values, a little chemistry, a decent job, maybe a kid or two…that they should be able to figure it out. That a good marriage can withstand life’s slings and arrows, if not unscathed, then at least intact.

Guess what? Life’s a lot bigger than two people. Sooner or later, a sneaker wave will knock you down, and you’ll need a hand to find your balance again. Perhaps it will be something small, like a messy house or a bad habit. Or something big: job loss, a health crisis. It may be something good: starting a new business, or winning the lottery. Or something bad: a death in the family, or an affair.

Whatever it is, there are people who can help.

Everyone’s supporting cast looks different. Some include a housecleaner or a babysitter. Others include a marriage counselor or a psychiatrist. Some need a financial advisor. Some just need their extended family or their friends. But everyone needs someone.

5. Treat your spouse as you hope your children will treat theirs.

Little eyes are watching. Little ears are listening. And little minds and hearts are learning about partnership and marriage from your example.

I say this not to promote guilt, paranoia or dishonesty. The worst thing we could do is to project a facade of shiny perfection to our kids. They’re smarter than that, and such playacting hurts and confuses them.

But it’s worth remembering that kids really do follow our lead, and we owe it to them to be mindful about what we’re teaching. And we owe it to ourselves to dig deep for the good stuff. We’re worth it

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